REVIEW: THE TURN OF THE KEY

AUTHOR: Ruth Ware
GENRE: Mystery, Thriller, Suspense, Psychological Thriller, Psychological Fiction
# OF PAGES: 352
STARS: ⭑⭑⭑⭑

From the minute I picked up this book, I was instantly hooked. My husband originally me the ‘Woman in Cabin 10’ for my birthday last year and getting me hooked with Ruth Ware was the best and worst mistake he’s made.

Ruth Ware’s latest suspense novel has a lot to measure up to. Its predecessor, “The Death of Mrs. Westaway,” was one of the best mystery novels of 2018, brilliantly repurposing just about every cobwebby prop in the Gothic warehouse, including a disputed inheritance, a crumbling ancestral mansion and a terrified-but-plucky young heroine. Ware sets expectations even higher by burdening her new novel with a brazen title: “The Turn of the Key.” What kind of suspense writer would be so reckless as to invoke Henry James’s masterpiece of terror and ambiguity and expect to see her own work do anything but suffer in the comparison?

We readers know that 27-year-old governess Rowan Caine is in torment from the very first pages. Ware introduces her through a series of letters she’s writing to a renowned barrister from the prison cell where she’s languishing. Rowan has been charged with the murder of one of the four children who’d been under her care. Rowan’s story unfolds in halting fashion through these letters, in which she describes how she came to take the position at Heatherbrae House in the remote Scottish Highlands and how things turned ghastly as soon as her employers — a posh couple with their own architecture practice — depart the premises to attend a faraway trade show

As the story unfolds, we see that Rowan is not who she originally says she is and is constantly finding herself feeling like she has to watch over her shoulder. In a modern meets Victorian house, she discovers secrets in this house and feels like something or someone is out to get her. Over the course of this suspense novel, Rowan gets involved in a predicament which ultimately ends her up in jail.

If you are into suspense fiction, buy this book immediately. You will find yourself hung on every word until you are regretting reading it too quickly. I was dying to know what happened next and finished this book in the matter of just a few days. I was NOT expecting it to end in the way it did, but was pleasantly (poor choice of wording?) surprised.

What are you currently reading? What genres are you typically drawn to? Let’s chat in the comments!

XO,

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REVIEW: The Lying Game

Genre: Mystery / Thriller
Rating: ✰✰✰


NO SPOILERS HERE!

From the New York Times bestselling author of “In a Dark, Dark Wood” and “The Woman in Cabin 10,” Ruth Ware’s “The Lying Game” is a book full of twists and turns that leave you wanting more.

My husband originally bought me Ware’s “The Woman in Cabin 10” as a birthday gift last year and I was immediately hooked with the cover to cover suspense. Between Ware’s writing style, I knew was in for a treat when reading the rest of her books. I am a sucker for a good suspense novel, so I knew “The Lying Game” would be right up my alley.

From the minute I picked up this book, I was instantly hooked. Any break I had after work or during my days off, I found myself curled up with this book dying to find out what happened next. Although “The Lying Game” holds slower pace than most of her other books, it is still definitely a must-read!

THE LYING GAME reads like a grown-up version of the hit TV show Pretty Little Liars (a personal favorite of mine in college). Readers meet four friends: Isa (our narrator), Kate, Fatima, and Thea. The girls all attend the same boarding school, Salten, and instantly become best friends. Kate was the free-will teenager, Fatima the smart and cautious friend, Isa the reserved level-head and Thea the rebel.

During their time together at Salten, the four girls created their own “lying game.” The rules of the lying game are clear: no lying to each other ever. Bail on the lie when it becomes clear it is about to be found out.

During their time at boarding school, this group thick as thieves always find themselves back at Kate’s house every weekend. They constantly check themselves out of school and dredge through fields and mud to that beloved house on the water. There, they fall in love with the reach and Kate’s dad, who treats them like his own. They are also introduced to Luc, who is like a brother to Kate and Ambrose’s other child.

After being expelled during their senior year due to the mysterious nature surrounding the death of the school’s art teacher and Kate’s dad, Ambrose, the girls slowly drift apart and live their separate lives. Although they go their separate ways, the four girls vow to keep this deadly secret between themselves at all costs.

As this story unravels, you learn that the three girls secretly deal with this notion that Kate killed her own father, but are constantly grappling with what her motive could’ve been.

After seventeen years apart, a text message arrives in the wee hours of the morning: I need you. Dropping everything and rushing back to the house at the Reach, the three girls come to Kate’s aid and try to put together pieces of the puzzle in what really happened to Ambrose.

Through their journey back together, they find answers that they never saw coming.

Do yourself a favor and check this book out, or any of Ruth Ware’s for that matter. You’re in for a real treat.

Thanks for stopping by!
Alex in Asheville